Wanderlust by Jona

Travel. Wanderlust. Blog. Photographer. Amanda Jona. Explore. Adventure. World. Traveller

How to be a More Climate Friendly Traveller

 
Happy Earth Day!
 
Earth Day was founded in 1970 and the idea behind it was to emerge the public concusses about air and water pollution and force environmental protection onto the political agenda. We, humans, are living far over earth's capacity, but there is hope! The environmental debate is bigger than ever and most people are starting to make sustainable choices. No one can do everything, but everybody can do something to save this wonderful planet we live on.
 
I think travelling is a great way to open up your eyes to the environmental problems in this world. Once you have gotten to see the world, you know how important it is to save it and therefore I've gathered some of my best tips on how to be a more climate-friendly traveller.
 
Look at Other Alternatives Than Flying
Flying is such an easy way to get around and see the world, but it's, unfortunately, the worst type of transportation for the environment. Airplanes contribute to insanely high numbers of CO2 and we can all just hope that science will give us more environmental friendly flights in the future, but until then it's good to look at other alternatives. If you don't think it's manageable I would like you to take a look at @earthwanderes who are currently travelling from Sweden to Iran without flying or @velovelo.se who are travelling the world by bike. It's a bit inconvenient but just think of all the magical places you might see that you would just have flown over with an airplane.
 
Bring Your Own Water Bottle
Reduce your plastic waste by bringing your own water bottle that you can refill instead of buying new ones in the store. This works even in countries where tap water isn't good to drink if you invest in some sort of water filtration/purifier. There are also pills you can buy to make the water drinkable or the oldest trick in the book - boil it before you drink it.
 
 
 
Eat Vegan
Did you know that for every kilo beef that is sold, 7 kg provender and 16 000 L water is used? I try to eat as much vegan food as possible for both environmental, ethical and health reasons and today it's not even that hard to do with a lot of good alternatives in both stores and restaurants! You do not have to go full-on vegan, even if you just exchange one or two meals a week from beef to vegan it's helping the environment a lot.
 
Use Public Transportation
The locals can survive on public transportation and so can you! I know that it's comfortable to go with a taxi or an uber when you have to get somewhere, but it's often even cheaper to go with the public transportation - and it gives you a whole new experience of the place you visit when you get to be around locals in their everyday life. It's also so much better for the climate, a win-win-win situation.
 
Join a Clean Up
Animals in nature are dying of starvation because their stomachs are filled with plastic and it's up to every one of us to keep nature waste free. Join an organized clean up, start one on your own or combine picking up trash in your everyday activities. Did you know that there's a Swedish expression for picking up trash while jogging, called "plogging"?
 
Say No To One Time Use Plastic Items
Spoons to your ice cream and straws to your soda, do you really need them? Probably not. Try to always carry around a spork and all spontaneous ice creams by the water and street food lunches can be free from plastic.
 
Avoid Taking Plastic Bags at Stores
We use 5 trillion plastic bags on earth a year and less than 1% of them gets recycled (!!!!). Just imagine how much we could minimize plastic waste in the world if everybody started to bring a backpack or a tote bag when they go shopping instead of taking these useless plastic bags.
 
 
 
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The Big Guide to Hike Galdhøpiggen

 
Are you looking forward to hiking northern Europe's highest mountain, Galdhøpiggen?
Awesome, that means you have reached the right place! I hiked the mountain in June 2017 together with my boyfriend, my boyfriend's brother, my boyfriend's brothers girlfriend and their dog and it was just such an amazing experience that I think everyone that has the opportunity should try - and therefore I've done a guide on how to hike Galdhøpiggen! Do you think there is something I've missed and are wondering about, just ask me in the comments below!
 
Height: 2469 meters above mean sea level (MAMSL)
Lenght: 6 kilometers, which might sound like nothing, but it's straight uphill and in snow
Time: It took us 5 hours up, and 3 hours down
When: The guides I've read says July-September but we hiked in June and that went well, just look at local weather reports before doing the hike
Where: Loms, Norway
 
 
 
Where to start?
The most common place to start the hike is from Spiterstulen (1104 MAMSL) and Juvasshytta (1841 MAMSL). We started from Spiterstulen which is classified as the easy way up since it's "just a hike", if you start at Juvashytta you'll have to cross a glacier and need to bring both ropes and a guide. At Spiterstulen you can just go, no guides or permits are currently needed.
 
 
 
Who can hike Galdhøpiggen?
I really want to exclaim "ALL!" to this since I live by the theory that you can do anything with the right motivation. However, I would like to say that you should be in good shape and it is good to have some knowledge of walking in snow - or go with someone who does. I am certainly not in good shape and got up to the top on will power, but I'm not sure if I would recommend someone else to do it, haha!
 
Whatever you do, don't be one of those who "give up" and call the mountain rescuers - they have far more important things to do than to "save" people who are tired or badly dressed. This is a big problem right now in the mountains, so please think one more time if you are really capable of doing this before you start.
 
 
 
What to wear?
"Clothes after weather" is a classic expression, but so true. The golden rule to hiking is to wear layers so you easily can put on/remove a layer of clothing if needed. Closest to the skin, I wore underclothing made out of wool. Over that, I wore waterproof hiking trousers and a wind and water-repellent softshell jacket (if it would ha rained or snowed, I would have worn a water-proof jacket instead) and on the way down I also wore a fleece jacket since it was more exhausting (=warmer) to go up than down ;)
 
On the feet, I wore two pairs of hiking socks, one thinner pair, and one thicker pair so they could rub against each other instead of rubbing against the skin to avoid blisters. I also wore a pair of hiking boots with Gore-Tex, regular sneakers are not recommended since you will walk in the snow - even in the middle of summer.
 
 
 
What to bring?
Camera, obviously! However, I can guarantee that you do not want to carry the entire camera equipment (you will hate yourself if you do, because it get's heavy!) so choose a camera body and a lens that you usually use (I brought my Canon EOS 5D Mark III + Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM) and then stick to that equipment.
 
In my backpack, I brought, except for the camera, some food, extra (dry!) clothes, blister patch, a water bottle and fully charged mobile phone. Now afterward, I would also recommend bringing Norwegian money (since there is a little shop at the top) and something to slide down on, perhaps a bum slider, since it makes the way down so much more FUN!
 
 
 
What to eat?
Before starting the hike, make sure to eat a big and steady breakfast. Do not even think about hiking a mountain with just a bowl of yogurt in your stomach! On the way up you probably will take short breaks so it's good to bring some nuts, fruits or power bars to refill the energy. I ate two sandwiches, three power bars, one banana and drank a lot of water on the way up, and ate nothing on the way down.
 
At the top of the mountain, there's a small cabin with a shop where you can buy sausages and souvenirs so don't forget to bring Norwegian money. I ate one sausage and drank a jar of coke at the top, and when we got down again we stopped for a pizza on the way home.
 
 
 
How is the terrain? 
Think of a snowy hill with some patches of grass and stones. The whole hike is quite even, but sometimes I needed to use both my hands to get up. The snow was quite compact, it usually was possible to walk without a problem, but sometimes you could take a step and sink down so you have snow to the waist. Be careful where you step!
 
 
 
Anything else?
Sherpas from Mount Everest have been to Galdhøpiggen and laid out a trail so you can walk safely on the mountain, FOLLOW THIS TRAIL! It is marked with red markings all the way from the start to the top, and if you go there it's no risk you will fall off a cliff somewhere.
 
Also, make sure to hike the mountain with someone, and/or have someone at the ground that knows when you started walking - and can notify you as missing if you're not down again after a reasonable amount of time. Keep in mind that the weather in the mountains changes quickly and even though it was sunshine when you left, it could be a snowstorm a couple of minutes later.
 
 
 
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The Breakfast Club - Amsterdam, Netherlands

 
We ate our first breakfast in Amsterdam at a restaurant called The Breakfast Club.
 
We found this place by coincidence and I'm so happy that we did! We had just arrived in Amsterdam and wanted to find a nice breakfast place when it out of nowhere started to hail! We stood in the middle of the street with our phones in our hands, trying to find anything nearby when a dutch woman appeared and asked if we needed help. How nice? With bad English, she tried to explain the directions to "a good breakfast place she had forgotten the name of" and we ended up at The Breakfast Club. I have no idea if this was the place she had in mind, but the interior was cute and the menu sounded delicious so we went in.
 
There are four different The Breakfast Clubs in Amsterdam and we ate at the one at Haarlemmerplein. Breakfast is my favourite meal of the day, and at this place, they serve it from morning to evening. A really good place to go to if you want some pancakes, sandwiches, cereals or eggs in other words!
 
 
Read more from Amsterdam
Travel Diary Day 1 - Travel Diary Day 2 - Travel Diary Day 3 - Hotel2Stay - Corner Bakery - Coffee & Coconuts
 
 
 
Quick facts about The Breakfast Club
 
Name: The Breakfast Club Haarlemmerplein
Menu: Breakfast dishes inspired from London, Mexico City and New York
Location: Haarlemmerplein 31, Amsterdam
Opening hours: Open daily 8 am to 6 pm
 
My rating: 
★★★★/★★★★★
 
 
 
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